Characterising Architectural Styles II – State

My last post explored some distinguishing characteristics of three common architectural styles in an attempt to understand better how they differ and therefore how they may apply in different contexts. A fourth distinguishing characteristic of these architectural styles is the way in which state is managed during the execution of a business process.

There are three aspects of state that I want to consider:

  • Management – how state change is initiated or managed through a business process.
  • Monitoring – how state is monitored or accessed or derived during the execution of a business process.
  • Consistency – how state is made consistent across different systems involved in a business process.

A summary of the state characteristics of the different architectural styles is listed in the following table along with the other characteristics discussed in my last post.

architectural_characteristics_table_2

In EAI, state is managed within one application and then synchronised to other applications, usually after the business process has completed. This means that in some cases state may be inconsistent across the organisation or its systems. That may or may not be a problem (see ‘Eventually Consistent‘) but is a common side effect when a business process is executed within one system rather than across systems in an independent process layer. During the execution of an EAI process, there is often no monitoring of the state. I.e. the process may simply replicate data changes to other systems without explicily tracking state. A limited form of state monitoring may exist in the sense that the local application or associated middleware may check the status of data synchronization and error out in the event of an exception. I refer to this as ‘local’ state monitoring. So under the EAI architectural style, state is managed locally, monitored locally (if at all) and is eventually consistent.

Under SOA, the driver of a business process is BPM orchestration in an independent process layer. In this case, we can say that state is managed centrally (in the BPM layer) and monitored centrally (also in the BPM layer). State in end-systems is updated progressively through the business process (via service calls) and so we could say that state is ‘progressively’ consistent as opposed to ‘eventually’ consistent.

Under EDA, there is no central or even local management of state. Instead, events signify distributed actions which together may be used to infer the state of a system. To the extent that any ‘management’ occurs, we could say that state is managed in a distributed fashion – one or more agents each acting on their own. Perhaps ¬†it is more accurate to say that state is manifested globally. Converesely, state is monitored centrally within an Event Processing (CEP) layer which correlates events to infer system state. Under EDA, state is progressively consistent because the system is progressively reacting to events which are a by-product of a hidden or implicit business process.

5 comments ↓

#1 Andy on 11.05.09 at 3:45 pm

I think you’ve had to shoehorn a bit, but I like what you’ve done.

I might characterise consistency in SOA as there is a “predefined state path”, whereas with CEP the state path can be completely flexible.

#2 Reductio ad Lucidus | soabloke on 11.11.09 at 10:51 am

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#3 The Year of Living Asynchronously | soabloke on 01.11.10 at 9:33 pm

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#4 The Year of Living Asynchronously | Illation Ltd on 01.13.10 at 10:05 pm

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#5 The Year of Living Asynchronously « « Illation.com Illation.com on 05.11.12 at 12:17 am

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